Friday, April 28, 2017

A Bloody Legacy by Lily Luchesi

34236072This review was written by: B and C
Received: Ebook from Author
Date of Publication: April 27, 2017
Pages: 40
Stars: 4/5

Official Summary:

Give in to the darkness within.

Rebecca Renfield and her best friend Johanna Seward are reopening an old sanatorium to start their psychology practice when Bec discovers old recordings from a John Seward pertaining to someone with her surname.  What she finds in the recordings are unnerving, but their new-shift doctor promises to provide the distraction Bec needs.

Victoria Draconis is a mysterious, beautiful woman who opens doors into levels of pain, pleasure, and submission that Bec had never imagined existed.


My Thoughts:
"Will you walk into my parlour?" said the Spider to the Fly,
'Tis the prettiest little parlour that ever you did spy;
The way into my parlour is up a winding stair,
And I've a many curious things to show when you are there." 
~Mary Howitt

Lily Luchesi has once again come out with a highly enjoyable read stamped with her signature supernatural mark but with a twist! Her audience once again gets a strong, alluring, sexy female vampire who isn't afraid to bite, but this time around we have a dominatrix vampire (Victoria) who becomes interested in a female psychologist named Rebecca.  A Bloody Legacy is a healthy mixture of mystery, F/F (erotic) romance, BDSM, and horror.

"You're a, uh...bondage girl?" I asked.
"Dominatrix," she corrected.  "And whether you know it or not, you are a perfect submissive."

What really brings this book together, though, we believe is the extremely atmospheric setting.  An old but recently renovated asylum with creepy patient files and an odd history?  SIGN US UP!  Plus, the spider and the fly concept held up throughout this novella brilliantly.  

We're not quite sure what it is about Luchesi's LGBT+ couples, but we love them!  Whether it's Brighton and Mark (Can we call ourselves their biggest fans?! SERIOUSLY.  NO JOKE.) or Victoria and Bec, she always does them so well and with justice.  The chemistry and flirtations are always on point and sizzling hot, especially in A Bloody Legacy.  (Be ready for some very intense, succulent scenes!)  You can't help but want to know more about the couples and delve into their relationship in greater detail.  It's great to see Luchesi explore a new genre (femdomme) and expand her horizons, too.  Plus, the references to current pop culture in A Bloody Legacy made us smile so hard (as always!) each time, particularly the one about Pok√©mon Go.  


(Sorry.  We lack self-control.) 

In the end, A Bloody Legacy is a quick, satisfying, sexy read with a dark, rather creepy ending that was more than fitting.  There are some surprising twists for such a quick story, which made A Bloody Legacy even more pleasurable and exciting than one might originally expect going into a forty page novella. (Never doubt Luchesi's skills!)  We loved the female Dracula-esque vibes.  Luchesi has a talent for creating strong, commanding females in her works, too, that are just so kick ass and make you want to go up to the person nearest you and say, "I'm so proud to be a woman."  Plus, in a world where culture tends to glorify and correlate beauty with a small dress size, it's utterly refreshing to see gorgeous, curvy women in Luchesi's works.  Can we get a standing ovation, please?

yes! photo: yes line tumblr_mn8yxxcNCV1ruuoaco10_400_zps2f383a09.gif




Thursday, April 27, 2017

Release Blitz: A Bloody Legacy by Lily Luchesi





Release Blitz:
A Bloody Legacy
By
Lily Luchesi

Apr 27th









Give in to the darkness within.
Rebecca Renfield and her best friend Johanna Seward are reopening an old sanatorium to start their psychology practice when Bec discovers old recordings from a John Seward pertaining to someone with her surname. What she finds in the recordings are unnerving, but their new night-shift doctor promises to provide the distraction Bec needs.
Victoria Draconis is a mysterious, beautiful woman who opens doors into levels of pain, pleasure, and submission that Bec had never imagined existed.















Lily Luchesi is a young author/poet born in Chicago, Illinois, now residing in Los Angeles, California. Ever since she was a toddler her mother noticed her tendency for being interested in all things "dark". At two she became infatuated with vampires and ghosts, and that infatuation turned into a lifestyle by the time she was twelve, and, as her family has always been what they now call "Gothic", she doesn't believe she shall ever change. She is also a hopeless romantic and avid music-love who will always associate vampires with love, blood, and rock and roll.
Her interest in poetry came around the same time as when she was given a book of Edgar Allan Poe's complete work. She then realized that she had been writing her own poetry since she could hold a pen, and just had not known the correct terms. She finished her first manuscript at the age of fourteen, and was first published at twenty-one.
Her debut novel, Stake-Out (Paranormal Detectives Series Book One), was published by Vamptasy Publishing on May 19th, 2015. Book two, Miranda's Rights, was released on January 8th, 2016. Book three, Life Sentence, was released on August 2nd, 2016 by Vamptasy Publishing, and book four, Right To Silence, was also just accepted by the publisher and will be released on January 17th, 2017.
She had a short story, "Undead Ever After" in the CHBB Publishing anthology Love Sucks (released on June 13th, 2015). Her first erotic short story, "Have No Fears", was published in the Hot Ink Press anthology Naughty Bedtime Stories: In Three Words on October 10th, 2015. She will also have a short erotic horror story, "The Devil's Dozen", in the Hot Ink Press anthology Death, Love, Lust, which was released on February 4th, 2016. Her horror short "Too Young To Kill" was released in the CHBB Publishing anthology Lurking In The Shadows on June 28th, 2016.



 

 


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Monday, April 10, 2017

Cover Reveal: A Bloody Legacy by Lily Luchesi





Cover Reveal:
A Bloody Legacy
By
Lily Luchesi

Apr 10th









Give in to the darkness within.
Rebecca Renfield and her best friend Johanna Seward are reopening an old sanatorium to start their psychology practice when Bec discovers old recordings from a John Seward pertaining to someone with her surname. What she finds in the recordings are unnerving, but their new night-shift doctor promises to provide the distraction Bec needs.
Victoria Draconis is a mysterious, beautiful woman who opens doors into levels of pain, pleasure, and submission that Bec had never imagined existed.









Lily Luchesi is a young author/poet born in Chicago, Illinois, now residing in Los Angeles, California. Ever since she was a toddler her mother noticed her tendency for being interested in all things "dark". At two she became infatuated with vampires and ghosts, and that infatuation turned into a lifestyle by the time she was twelve, and, as her family has always been what they now call "Gothic", she doesn't believe she shall ever change. She is also a hopeless romantic and avid music-love who will always associate vampires with love, blood, and rock and roll.
Her interest in poetry came around the same time as when she was given a book of Edgar Allan Poe's complete work. She then realized that she had been writing her own poetry since she could hold a pen, and just had not known the correct terms. She finished her first manuscript at the age of fourteen, and was first published at twenty-one.
Her debut novel, Stake-Out (Paranormal Detectives Series Book One), was published by Vamptasy Publishing on May 19th, 2015. Book two, Miranda's Rights, was released on January 8th, 2016. Book three, Life Sentence, was released on August 2nd, 2016 by Vamptasy Publishing, and book four, Right To Silence, was also just accepted by the publisher and will be released on January 17th, 2017.
She had a short story, "Undead Ever After" in the CHBB Publishing anthology Love Sucks (released on June 13th, 2015). Her first erotic short story, "Have No Fears", was published in the Hot Ink Press anthology Naughty Bedtime Stories: In Three Words on October 10th, 2015. She will also have a short erotic horror story, "The Devil's Dozen", in the Hot Ink Press anthology Death, Love, Lust, which was released on February 4th, 2016. Her horror short "Too Young To Kill" was released in the CHBB Publishing anthology Lurking In The Shadows on June 28th, 2016.



 

 


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Obsessive Pimpettes Promotions








Monday, March 27, 2017

The Secret of Dreadwillow Carse by Brian Farrey

25810641
This review was written by: B
Received: Publisher (Algonquin Young Readers)
Date of Publication: April 2016
Pages: 245
Stars: 4/5

Official Summary:
A princess and a peasant girl must embark on a dangerous quest to outwit a centuries-old warning foretelling the fall of the Monarchy in this modern fairy tale.

In the center of the verdant Monarchy lies Dreadwillow Carse, a black and desolate bog that the happy people of the land do their best to ignore.  Little is known about it, except for one dire warning: If any monarch enters Dreadwillow Carse, then the Monarchy will fall.  Twelve-year-old Jeniah yearns to know what the marsh could possibly conceal that might topple her family's thousand-year reign of peace and prosperity.

Meanwhile, in the nearby town of Emberfell, where everyone lives with unending joy, a girl named Aon hides a sorrow she can never reveal.  She knows that something in the Carse -- something that sings a haunting tune only Aon can hear -- holds the cure for her sadness.  Yet no matter how many times she tries to enter, the terror-inducing dreadwillow treees keep her away.

After a chance meeting, Princess Jeniah and Aon hatch a plan to send Aon into the heart of the Carse to unlock its darkest secret.  But when Aon doesn't return, a guilt-stricken Jeniah must enter the Carse to try and rescue her friend -- even if it means risking the entire Monarchy.

My Thoughts:

"Questions are the lamplight that lead us from the darkness.  And you know what lamplight really is, yes?  Fire.  You should tread carefully your highness."
~Skonas (The Secret of Dreadwillow Carse)


What is a young girl to do when her beloved mother, the queen of an entire kingdom, suddenly falls ill, leaving the girl with no other choice but to take up the throne much earlier than expected?  This sudden horror has just become Jeniah's reality.  She's a headstrong individual with a curiosity like no other and a desire to do her kingdom justice, a kingdom that has known nothing but prosperity for centuries upon centuries.  However, she thought she had years to learn about becoming an efficient ruler before officially taking the throne, but this luxury is suddenly taken away from her as she is left with no other option.  As time is quickly running out for her to understand how to fairly rule just as the current cherished queen does, the overbearing remembrance of her sickly mother is constantly hanging in the back of her mind.  As a result, the fact that she is told the entire Monarchy will fall before her very eyes if she ever steps foot in the forbidden Dreadwillow Carse isn't exactly making the situation any better.  Put a mystery in front of Jeniah, and she won't let the subject go until she figures it all out.

Aon is just a village girl living under the kingdom's rule . . . but she's not like the other villagers.  No, Aon's got a secret of her very own that alienates her, even from her own family.  Nobody else in the entire kingdom, save for the royalty, knows what sadness is or can even fathom the concept, let alone define it.  Yet, Aon's the exception.  This makes her drawn to the Carse (the one place in the entire kingdom that every other villager refuses to step foot in) where she is strangely comforted.

By a twist of fate, Jeniah's and Aon's lives intertwine, leading them both on a journey they never could have imagined!  In return for a personal request to Jeniah, Aon agrees to figure out what goes on inside the enigmatic Carse for the princess, as no one else will dare go near the bog of unnatural darkness in a world that only knows light. However, something goes terribly wrong, and Jeniah is forced to put her entire kingdom at stake for one subject!
______________________________________________

The Secret of Dreadwillow Carse will take you on a journey that not many fantasy Middle Grade novels have ever gone on before, challenging the reader to face hard-hitting questions while going on a creepy, topsy-turvy ride into a kingdom that never could have been imagined except by Brian Farrey!  My favorite MG novels have always been in either the fantasy or contemporary genres, my ultimate favorites being The Thing About Jellyfish (contemporary) and The Thickety (fantasy).  The fact that this book even rivaled my deep love of The Thickety by J. A. White, which  is ridiculously hard to do, shocked me to my genuine, bookish core. I honestly had no idea how much I would come to deeply love and appreciate this delightfully spooky novel!    

Farrey painted an eerie picture of a happy little kingdom that made me question just how far a conscience mind was willing to go in order to stay in a complete trance of bliss.  For example, if a local villager was to die, he or she would immediately be forgotten by those around them, their house abandoned, and their children taken in by an adoptive family, as if there was never a loss to begin with.  And the worst part was that the villagers had no idea that they were actually doing this.  They knew no other way or emotions to conjure in these traditionally sorrowful times.  Aon was the only one who noticed how messed up life truly was, but voicing her observations would have made no difference to the contented people who surrounded her every waking moment.  I'm sure that everyone can easily agree that, hypothetically speaking, being in a constant jovial state without any stress or sorrow would be a blessing, but this book almost made it seem like an unwanted curse!

The two great female leads were much appreciated, as they were able to represent different struggles and opportunities throughout the book, as well as showcase that girls can have just as awesome of adventures as boys ever could and be equally brilliant and strong!  (Haha Happenstance (the Books of Umber), Conn (the Magic Thief series), Beck (the Pillage series), and the Time Warp Trio dudes!!!! Guess not all books are dominated by males! Those are all really good books, though, guys.  Check them out.  Seriously.  They're awesome, and that last part was not sarcasm!)  For example, Aon communicated that being different had its own strengths, even though being different made her an outsider.  If she hadn't been an outsider who had no qualms about going into the Carse, Jeniah would have never been able to investigate the Carse through a secondary party.

I also loved how Farrey demonstrated that being able to feel sadness wasn't something to be ashamed of.  Instead, he tried to make the audience understand that it was normal and something that one shouldn't have to hide, which is a great message for the book's directed age range.  In fact, the author tried to express the positive side to being unhappy or melancholic (if you can imagine that!).  He conveyed that it is important to grieve and remember those who we have lost, and while recalling past loved ones may be painful, it can also bring about closure, fonder memories, hidden strength, and creative outlets.


Two other fabulous and thoroughly explored themes that I adored in The Secret of Dreadwillow Carse were curiosity and decision making.

Answers are the pyre that banishes darkness altogether.
~Skonas (The Secret of Dreadwillow Carse)

Despite the fact that Jeniah was constantly told to not question specific subjects (particularly the Carse) she couldn't help herself.  However, she later discovered that some questions may be hard to answer and/or even fathom.  Perhaps you may even wish that you never found out the truth to begin with, yet without truth, life would be a lie.  I absolutely loved how this concept was explored and laid out.  The story couldn't have unfolded in a better way, with a creepy, slightly unsettling atmosphere that only deepened as the book came to a finish, which makes The Secret of Dreadwillow Carse enjoyable for all ages.  I couldn't have asked for a better ending!


I highly recommend this book if you're looking for a unique MG experience with a surprisingly ominous atmosphere, an addictive mystery, a kick-butt female relationship, and amazing themes. Look no further!  This is the perfect fit for you! 


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Monday, March 6, 2017

Escape from Witchwood Hollow by Jordan Elizabeth

24239419This review was written by: B
Received: E-book from Author
Publication Date of Book: October 2014
Pages: 200 (Kindle Edition)
Stars: 4/5

Official Summary:

Everyone in Arnn -- a small farming town with more legends than residents -- knows the story of Witchwood Hollow: if you venture into the whispering forest, the witch will trap your soul among the shadowed trees.

After losing her parents in a horrific terrorist attack on the Twin Towers, fifteen-year-old Honoria and her older brother escape New York City to Arnn.  In the lure of that perpetual darkness, Honoria finds hope, when she should be afraid.  

Perhaps the witch can reunite her with her lost parents.  Awakening the witch, however, brings more than salvation from mourning, for Honoria discovers a past of missing children and broken  promises.

To save the citizens of Arnn from becoming the witch's next victims, she must find the truth behind the woman's madness.

How deep into Witchwood Hollow does Honoria dare venture? 


My Thoughts:

She (Honoria) picked her way through the vegetation.  Briars caught on her jeans.  Go back, they seemed to say, or we will prick your heart.  A sweet, earthy scent tickled her nose.  Stepping deeper into the woods, autumn leaves created a shield around her as damp soil sucked at the soles of her sneakers.  The darkness became an envelope and she the letter, seeking a destination she couldn't foresee.  

~Escape from Witchwood Hollow


This book has interested me since February of 2015, but I had unfortunately never been able to get my hands on it.  It had always been in the back of my mind, though, as I'm obsessed with YA fantasy and paranormal stories.  I have also been slowly but surely trying to collect books from Curiosity Quills Press (the book's publisher). You can then imagine my immense excitement when the author asked me if I would accept an ebook of Escape from Witchwood Hollow in exchange for an honest review!  I jumped on this opportunity and am still reeling in the rich world of Witchwood Hollow as we speak.  (Of course, we aren't technically speaking, rather it's you reading without a back and forth conversation with me, but it honestly sounded better than, "...am still reeling in the rich world of Witchwood Hollow as you read."  I don't know where I'm going with this, and (sigh) I digress.)

I'm a huge sucker for close or quirky familial relationships in books, and I can't explain to you how much I die each time I find one.  (This isn't necessarily something that shows up regularly in the novels I read, so I always especially cherish them when they fall across my path.)  With Escape from Witchwood Hollow, one would naturally assume that you wouldn't get this spectacular add-on since it's a book that, on the outside, appears to primarily focus on the superstitious town of Arnn and its inhabitants in general.  In reality, it is so much more, and  I was in for a surprising bonus when Jordan portrayed a highly realistic and heartfelt relationship between Honoria and her older brother Geoffrey.  Yes, this is by no means the focal point of the novel, but it was definitely one of my favorite aspects of it.  The siblings' parents died in the 9/11 terrorist attacks, and the way that Honoria leaned on and appreciated Geoffrey went straight to my fangirl heart, and the authentic nature and interactions between them melted me into a puddle.  








My other favorite part of the novel was the writing itself.  Each time Witchwood Hollow was described, I felt as if I was in a part of the woods itself.  Jordan's writing of the hollow was rich and vivid.  Imagine looking at an all-consuming, omnipresent painting that steals your entire attention away -- remaining in your mind's eye even when your eyelids are closed.  This was Witchwood Hollow, as flawlessly beautiful as the writing was mesmerizing.  Part eerie and part lonely, the hollow selfishly kept all of those who dared to step into it.  I felt so immersed in the story that it was as if I was walking in the hollow itself, in all of its confounding glory, which is largely due to the perfected tone of this novel.  Allow me to explain. But first, a little backstory . . .

I'll be honest, I'm an easily frightened individual.  Set me in front of a horror movie and the majority of the time anyone looks over, I'll have a pillow covering my entire face.  Occasionally, you'll hear me ask (all muffled-like, of course): "What's happening now?  Is it scary?  It sounds scary.  Guys, I asked what's happening!  Why isn't anyone answering me?!"  Oh, and don't even get me started on spiders.  I see one and I'm like:




Why bring this up you ask?  The tone of Escape from Witchwood Hollow was haunting, especially when the characters were actually in Witchwood Hollow.  (Of course, how these parts and the story as a whole will affect readers shall immensely differ from person to person.)  I honestly found it frightening, though, but not in the typical sense of the word.  It wasn't because Witchwood Hollow was written to personify a slasher, horror, or paranormal vibe.  Instead, it was because the hollow magnified isolation and loneliness in their terrifying, all-consuming glory.  It was a completely different type of horror, one that was a never-ending maze paired with the heart-stopping realization that no one you loved would ever be able to reach you because they couldn't find you.  It was an embodiment of the fact that while you lived, your family would die as you stayed lost to time forever.  I don't know about you, but I find that more frightening and heart-wrenching than any classic horror movie out there.  I get distressed just thinking about what the characters must have went through.  (Cue me throwing a pillow in front of my face now.)

What I was not expecting from this novel were the three different storylines that Jordan presented.  It was a brilliant idea and a game changer for the novel on her part.  Honoria was a little difficult for me to connect with at first, and I found myself gravitating towards an interest in other characters, particularly Elizabeth Clifford.  (I would read an entire book from her point of view if I could!)  Then, I eventually found myself gravitating towards Albertine.  (Right now, you might be like: Who the heck are they?  I feel it is best, though, not to tell you anything about these two characters because it would make the story more interesting if you went into the book more blind than not.)  Over time, though, I got used to Honoria's voice and began to appreciate her as a character.  I just needed a bit of time to warm up to her is all.  

And that ending!  My goodness!  I loved every second of it, and I thought I had it all figured out with what the author had done . . . that is until I read other people's interpretations of the ending on GoodReads.  Now I'm not too sure . . . like . . . at all.  I'm freaking out over it because I need a straight forward answer!  But again, I digress.

Escape from Witchwood Hollow is a fantastic, eerie book to read in one sitting.  It's got multiple, interweaving storylines (Who doesn't love those?!), great themes (like family and moving on), and a mesmeric atmosphere.  I would definitely recommend this book to fans of The Secret of Dreadwillow Carse!


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